Survivor: South Pacific

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Survivor

Survivor: South Pacific is the twenty-third season of the American CBS competitive reality television series Survivor. The season premiered on September 14, 2011, and concluded on December 18, 2011, with Sophie Clarke crowned the winner. The season was filmed from May 30 through July 7, 2011, in Samoa, the same location as the previous two seasons.

The season featured 18 castaways, including two returning players, Oscar “Ozzy” Lusth and Benjamin “Coach” Wade, who were placed on separate tribes by random draw. The two tribes were named Savaii and Upolu, and they competed against each other in various challenges to win rewards and immunity. The season also introduced a new twist called Redemption Island, where eliminated players could return to the game after winning a series of duels.

Survivor: South Pacific was a season filled with drama, strategy, and unexpected twists. From the formation of alliances to the blindside of key players, the season kept viewers on the edge of their seats. The season also received mixed reviews from fans and critics, with some praising the cast and gameplay, while others criticized the lack of diversity and predictable outcome.

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Key Takeaways

  • Survivor: South Pacific is the twenty-third season of the American CBS competitive reality television series Survivor, which premiered on September 14, 2011, and concluded on December 18, 2011.
  • The season featured 18 castaways, including two returning players, Ozzy and Coach, who were placed on separate tribes by random draw. The season introduced a new twist called Redemption Island, where eliminated players could return to the game after winning a series of duels.
  • The season received mixed reviews from fans and critics, with some praising the cast and gameplay, while others criticized the lack of diversity and predictable outcome.

Overview of Survivor: South Pacific

Survivor: South Pacific is the twenty-third season of the competitive reality television series Survivor, which aired on American CBS from September 14, 2011, to December 18, 2011. The season was filmed in Upolu, Samoa, and was the third season to be filmed in the country, tied with Panama. The season featured eighteen contestants divided into two tribes, Savaii and Upolu, with the introduction of the Te Tuna tribe later in the game.

The season brought back Redemption Island, first introduced in the prior season. Redemption Island is a twist in which eliminated players can return to the game for a second time. The season was won by Sophie Clarke, who beat Coach Wade Albert Destrade in a 6-3 vote.

Survivor: South Pacific was well-received by audiences and critics alike, with many praising the return of Redemption Island and the strategic gameplay of the contestants. The season also saw the return of several popular players from previous seasons, including Ozzy Lusth and Coach Wade Albert Destrade.

Overall, Survivor: South Pacific was a successful season of the long-running reality television series, offering fans of the show an exciting and engaging competition filled with memorable moments and strategic gameplay.

Location and Filming

Survivor: South Pacific was filmed in Upolu, Samoa. Upolu is the second largest island in Samoa and home to the capital, Apia. The island is known for its lush rainforests, beautiful beaches, and clear blue waters. The location provided an ideal setting for the show with its tropical climate and diverse terrain.

The show was filmed in May 2011 and lasted until July 2011. The contestants were split into two tribes, Savaii and Upolu, and were tasked with surviving in the wilderness while competing in various challenges. The show’s production team worked closely with local authorities to ensure that the filming was done safely and respectfully.

Survivor: South Pacific is just one of many seasons of the show that has been filmed in exotic locations around the world. Other locations include Fiji, Tonga, Panama, and many others. The show’s producers carefully select each location based on its unique features and ability to provide the contestants a challenging and exciting environment.

Overall, the location and filming of Survivor: South Pacific in Upolu, Samoa, provided a stunning backdrop for the show’s intense competition and drama. The beautiful island setting and challenging terrain made for an unforgettable season of Survivor.

Contestants and Tribes

Survivor: South Pacific featured 18 contestants divided into two tribes, Savaii and Upolu. The Savaii tribe consisted of Jim Rice, Keith Tollefson, Mark “Papa Bear” Caruso, Ozzy Lusth, Semhar Tadesse, Elyse Umemoto, Whitney Duncan, and Dawn Meehan. The Upolu tribe consisted of Albert Destrade, Brandon Hantz, Benjamin “Coach” Wade, Christine Shields Markoski, Edna Ma, Mikayla Wingle, Rick Nelson, Sophie Clarke, and Stacey Powell.

The season was notable for including returning castaway Ozzy Lusth, who previously appeared on Survivor: the Cook Islands and Micronesia. Also, Brandon Hantz, nephew of three-time Survivor contestant Russell Hantz, debuted on the show.

The tribes were named after the islands of Samoa, where the season was filmed. Savaii was named after the largest island in Samoa, while Upolu was named after the second-largest island.

The contestants competed in various challenges throughout the season to win rewards and immunity. The tribes merged into one, Te Tuna, after 12 days of competition. The merged tribe consisted of all the remaining players except Semhar Tadesse and Papa Bear Caruso, who were voted out before the merge.

Survivor: South Pacific was a highly competitive season with strong players such as Ozzy Lusth, Albert Destrade, Sophie Clarke, and John Cochran. The castaways faced numerous twists and turns throughout the season, including the introduction of Redemption Island, where eliminated players had a chance to return to the game.

Gameplay and Challenges

Survivor: South Pacific featured a variety of challenges that tested the physical and mental abilities of the contestants. There were immunity challenges, where the winning team or individual was safe from elimination at the tribal council, and reward challenges, where the winning team received a prize such as food or a trip.

One of the most memorable challenges of the season was the “Blind Leading the Blind” immunity challenge, where one member of each tribe was blindfolded and had to be directed by their tribemates to collect puzzle pieces. The first tribe to complete the puzzle won immunity.

Another notable challenge was the “Get a Grip” immunity challenge, where contestants had to hold onto a pole for as long as possible. The last person standing won immunity for their tribe.

In addition to the challenges, the season also featured duels where contestants who had been voted out of the game had a chance to return. These duels often involved physical endurance and mental fortitude.

The hidden immunity idol also played a significant role in Survivor: South Pacific gameplay. Contestants could find the idol hidden around camp or win it at a challenge. The idol could be played at the tribal council to save oneself or another contestant from elimination.

Overall, the challenges and gameplay of Survivor: South Pacific were intense and kept viewers on the edge of their seats. The strategic moves made by the contestants, combined with the physical challenges, made for an exciting and unpredictable season.

Key Events and Twists

Survivor: South Pacific had several key events and twists that made it a memorable season. Here are some of the most notable ones:

Redemption Island

Redemption Island was reintroduced in Survivor: South Pacific after its first appearance in the previous season, Survivor: Redemption Island. This twist allowed eliminated players to compete in duels for a chance to return to the game. The last player standing at Redemption Island would re-enter the game later.

Double Elimination

In Survivor: South Pacific, a double elimination occurred when two players were voted out at the same Tribal Council. This twist added a new layer of strategy to the game, as players had to decide who to vote out first and who to keep for later.

Heroes vs. Villains

Survivor: South Pacific featured a Heroes vs. Villains theme, where the castaways were divided into two tribes based on their perceived hero or villain status. This twist added an interesting dynamic to the game, as players had to navigate alliances and betrayals based on their assigned tribe.

Final Tribal Council

The Final Tribal Council in Survivor: South Pacific had a unique format, with the final three players facing a jury of eight instead of the usual seven. This twist made it more difficult for players to secure the necessary votes to win, as they had to convince an additional jury member of their worthiness.

Final Three

Survivor: South Pacific was one of the few seasons to have a final three instead of the usual two. This twist allowed for a more diverse range of players to make it to the end and potentially win the game.

Jury

The jury in Survivor: South Pacific consisted of eight members, who were responsible for voting for the winner of the game. This twist added an element of unpredictability, as players had to consider the opinions and biases of the jury members when making strategic moves.

Production and Release

Survivor: South Pacific is the twenty-third season of the American CBS competitive reality television series Survivor. The season was filmed over a period of 39 days from May 30 through July 7, 2011, in Upolu, Samoa, where Survivor: Samoa and Survivor: Heroes vs. Villains took place. Approximately 800 applicants visited in various states, and from there, 16 contestants were chosen as participants. The show premiered on September 14, 2011, for 16 episodes.

Applications for the show were due on January 11, 2011. The production team reviewed the applications and chose the 16 contestants who would participate in the show. The contestants were divided into two tribes, Savaii and Upolu. They were tasked with surviving on a deserted island while competing in various challenges to win rewards and avoid being voted off the island.

The production team worked hard to ensure the show was entertaining and engaging. They designed unique challenges that tested the contestants’ physical and mental abilities, and they created a beautiful and immersive setting for the show. The show’s host, Jeff Probst, also played an important role in the show’s production, providing commentary and guidance to the contestants.

Survivor: South Pacific premiered on September 14, 2011, and was well-received by audiences. The show’s unique format and engaging challenges kept viewers coming back week after week, and the contestants’ personal stories and struggles added an emotional depth to the show. Overall, Survivor: South Pacific was a successful season of the long-running reality television series.

Public Reception and Ratings

Survivor: South Pacific received mixed reviews from critics and audiences alike. According to Metacritic, the season scored 61 out of 100 based on 11 reviews, indicating “generally favorable reviews.” On Rotten Tomatoes, the season has an approval rating of 57% based on 14 reviews, with an average rating of 6.3/10.

The season’s ratings were steady, with an average of 11.8 million weekly viewers. The finale aired on December 18, 2011, and was watched by 12.3 million viewers and received a 3.5 rating/9 share in the 18-49 demographic. The ratings were down from the previous season, Survivor: Redemption Island, which averaged 12.3 million viewers and a 3.6 rating/10 share in the 18-49 demographic.

Some critics praised the season for its drama and unpredictable gameplay, while others criticized its reliance on returning players and lack of standout contestants. The return of Redemption Island, a twist that allows eliminated players to compete for a chance to re-enter the game, also drew mixed reactions.

Despite the mixed reviews, the season did have some memorable moments, including the rise of “dating coach” Albert Destrade as a strategic player and the blindsiding of fan-favorite Ozzy Lusth. The season also featured appearances by country music star Whitney Duncan and former Nashville Star contestant Jim Rice.

In summary, Survivor: South Pacific received mixed reviews and steady ratings. While it had its share of memorable moments and controversial twists, it did not reach the same level of acclaim as some of the show’s earlier seasons.

Post-Show Updates

Since the final episode of Survivor: South Pacific aired, several updates and developments have been related to the show and its contestants. Here are some of the highlights:

  • Winners at War: Several contestants from Survivor: South Pacific went on to compete in subsequent seasons of the show, including Winners at War. This special season brought together previous winners from various seasons to compete for a $2 million prize. Sophie Clarke, who won Survivor: South Pacific, was one of the contestants on this season.
  • Caramoan: Another subsequent season of Survivor that featured contestants from the South Pacific was Caramoan. This season, which aired in 2013, brought back fan-favorite contestants from prior seasons to compete against each other. Several contestants from South Pacific, including Cochran and Dawn Meehan, were among the cast.
  • Outlast: Surviving on an island for weeks and outlasting other contestants is one of the main goals of Survivor. In South Pacific, Sophie Clarke was able to do just that, winning the title of Sole Survivor and the $1 million prize that comes with it.
  • Prize Money: While the prize for winning Survivor has always been $1 million, the show has occasionally offered additional cash prizes to contestants. In South Pacific, for example, the second-place finisher received $100,000 in addition to the $1 million prize.
  • Economic Problems: In the years since Survivor: South Pacific aired, the world has faced several economic challenges. The show has not been immune to these problems, and there have been reports of budget cuts and other cost-saving measures being implemented in recent seasons.

Overall, Survivor: South Pacific was a successful season of the long-running reality show, with memorable contestants and dramatic moments. While the show has faced some challenges recently, it remains a famous and influential part of the television landscape.

Elimination order for Survivor: South Pacific, season 24

The elimination order for Survivor: South Pacific is as follows:

  1. Semhar Tadesse
  2. Mark “Papa Bear” Caruso
  3. Stacey Powell
  4. Elyse Umemoto
  5. Mikayla Wingle
  6. Keith Tollefson
  7. Jim Rice
  8. Whitney Duncan
  9. Dawn Meehan
  10. John Cochran
  11. Edna Ma
  12. Rick Nelson
  13. Brandon Hantz
  14. Ozzy Lusth
  15. Rick Nelson (again)
  16. Benjamin “Coach” Wade
  17. Albert Destrade

Frequently Asked Questions

Who won Survivor: South Pacific?

Sophie Clarke won Survivor: South Pacific. She received six votes from the jury, Benjamin “Coach” Wade received three, and Albert Destrade received none.

Who were the final three contestants in Survivor: South Pacific?

The final three contestants in Survivor: South Pacific were Sophie Clarke, Benjamin “Coach” Wade, and Albert Destrade.

Did Cochran win Survivor: South Pacific?

No, John Cochran did not win Survivor: South Pacific. He was voted out in 10th place.

Why didn’t Coach win Survivor: South Pacific?

Coach did not win Survivor: South Pacific because the jury ultimately decided to vote for Sophie Clarke instead. Some jurors felt that Coach had betrayed them during the game, and others believed that Sophie had played a better overall game.

Who did Ozzy vote for in Survivor: South Pacific?

Ozzy Lusth, eliminated in fourth place, voted for Sophie Clarke to win Survivor: South Pacific.

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